Feeding Baby – More Foods

Dear Sis,

It is shocking how much diversity can be offered to babies in the way of food! We stopped trying new things because we ran out of allotted freezer space, but here are other ideas we might try in future!

More Fruits (6 mo +)

Blackberries

No cooking needed. Simply wash, puree, and freeze in portions. 

Flavor compatible with Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Banana, Blueberry, Carrot, Kiwi, Mango, Nectarine, Oatmeal Cereal, Peach, Pear, Prune, Raspberry, Strawberry, and Yogurt

Kiwi

No cooking needed. Peel, slice, puree, and freeze in portions.

Flavor compatible with Apple, Banana, Blackberry, Blueberry, Cherry, Mango, Pear, Prune, Raspberry, Strawberry, and Yogurt

Nectarines

No cooking needed. Wash, chop, puree, and freeze in portions.

Flavor compatible with Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Banana, Blackberry, Blueberry, Cherry, Green Bean, Mango, Oatmeal Cereal, Peach, Pear, Prune, Raspberry, Strawberry, Yogurt, and Zucchini

More Vegetables (6 mo +)

Asparagus

Cut away woody ends. Steam 4-8 minutes, puree, and freeze in portions.

Flavor compatible with Banana, Brown Rice, Carrot Cauliflower, Parsnip, Quinoa, Spinach, Sweet Pea, and Zucchini

Broccoli & Cauliflower

Fresh: Steam florets 6-8 minutes, puree, and freeze in portions.

Frozen: Thaw florets, puree, and freeze in portions.

Broccoli is flavor compatible with Apple, Banana, Brown Rice, Butternut Squash, Carrots, Cauliflower, Quinoa, Parsnip, Pear, Prune, Pumpkin, and Sweet Potato

Cauliflower is flavor compatible with Apple, Asparagus, Banana, Broccoli, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Kale, Parsnip, Pear, Prune, Pumpkin, Spinach, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato

Kale

Cut away stems, chop, and steam 3-5 minutes in small batches before pureeing and freezing.

Flavor compatible with Apple, Banana, Brown Rice, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Cauliflower, Quinoa, Parsnip, Peach, Pear, Prune, Pumpkin, Strawberry, and Sweet Potato

Turnips

Peel and chop before steaming 15 minutes. Puree and freeze in portions.

Flavor compatible with Apple, Brown Rice, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Quinoa, Parsnip, Pear, Pumpkin, Sweet Pea, Sweet Potato, and Zucchini

Zucchini

Cut away ends, slice, and steam 5-7 minutes before pureeing and freezing in portions.

Flavor compatible with Apple, Asparagus, Banana, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Cherry, Green Bean, Nectarine, Quinoa, Parsnip, Peach, Pear, Pumpkin, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato

Legumes (6 mo +)

Black, Cannellini (White Kidney), Garbanzo (Chickpeas), Kidney, Pinto, Navy, & Northern Beans

Drain and rinse canned beans. Simmer 5 minutes in 1 cup water. Drain, puree, and freeze in portions. 

Legume Flour (Dried Lentils or Split Peas)

Process dry legumes into a fine powder. Store airtight.

Legume Cereal
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 c water
  2. 2 T legume flour
Instructions
  1. Bring water to a boil in a saucepan.
  2. Whisk in legume flour for 5-8 minutes; until thick and smooth.
  3. Refrigerate up to 1 week.
Notes
  1. Add to baby puree as you would other cereals. Flavor most compatible with vegetable blends.
Tag Sis, You're It! http://www.tagsisyoureit.com/
Happy Baby Feeding,

b

Introducing Cereal

Stage One Baby FoodStage Two Baby Food

Introducing Meats & Yogurt

Un-constipate with Prunes

Facebooktwitterpinterestmail

Feeding Baby – Introducing Meats

Dear Sis,

At our six month baby well check, the pediatrician suggested introducing yogurt and meats to Mr. Baby to help bulk him up:) Of course, we had to figure out how to do that ourselves too!

Poultry (6 mo +)

We purchased 1 pound organic boneless skinless chicken breast. If you are working with ground chicken or turkey, the cooking instructions for red meat can be applied. 

We tossed our chicken breast in a saucepan. Covered it with water and added a sprinkle of oregano for flavor, simmering until cooked through. 

Then, we sliced up the chicken and hand shredded the sliced chicken as we placed it in the food processor with a bit of stewing broth. 

We didn’t take away all the texture and turn it into paste like store bought baby food, but we did get it into fine bits that baby wouldn’t choke on if he swallowed a mouthful without chewing. 

Red Meat (6 mo +)

We purchased 1 pound lean organic grass-fed ground beef.

We tossed it in a skillet over medium heat and browned it with some chopped onion for additional flavor.

Then, we tossed it in the food processor. We didn’t take away all the texture and turn it into paste like store bought baby food, but we did get it into fine bits that baby wouldn’t choke on if he swallowed a mouthful without chewing.

We froze it in portions just like our other homemade baby food.

. . . . .

At first, we tried to mix meat portions with our other puree, but we found that homemade baby food is too dry on even with other veggies and fruits mixed in. We decided maybe commercial brands had a good idea… Gravy! So we made a batch of vegetable stock gravy and froze it in portions, to be added to red meat or poultry portions.

Gravy
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 T butter or ghee
  2. unbleached flour
  3. 2 c vegetable stock
Instructions
  1. Melt butter or ghee in a saucepan over medium heat. Stir in enough flour to make a thin dough.
  2. Whisk in stock a bit at a time, returning to a simmer between additions and stirring continuously until all stock is added and gravy is desired thickness.
  3. Pour into freezer tray. Cool before placing in the freezer. Store portions in a labeled freezer bag up to three months.
Tag Sis, You're It! http://www.tagsisyoureit.com/

Flavor Compatibility

Beef & Gravy go well with Brown Rice, Carrot, Green Bean, Mashed Potato, Sweet Corn, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Poultry & Gravy go well with Apple, Apricot, Brown Rice, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Mango, Mashed Potato, Peach, Pear, Quinoa, Spinach, Sweet Corn, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Happy Baby Feeding!

b

Introducing Cereal

DIY Stage One FoodsDIY Stage Two Foods

Introducing Yogurt

Facebooktwitterpinterestmail

Feeding Baby – Introducing Yogurt

Dear Sis,

At our six month baby well check, the pediatrician suggested introducing yogurt and meats to Mr. Baby to help bulk him up:) Yogurt is a simple baby food!

Yogurt (6 mo +)

We purchase organic whole milk yogurt. We make mix up a fruit puree and then add 1T yogurt. It really is that simple! 

Making yogurt is old hat for us, but for those who are interested you can learn how here. Yogurt Making is surprisingly simple!

Fruit and Yogurt is one of our favorite breakfast options.

Fresh pureed banana, thawed peach and strawberry, and 1 T yogurt.

Ready to eat!

 

Happy Baby Feeding!

b

Introducing Cereal

DIY Stage One Foods & DIY Stage Two Foods

Introducing Meats

Facebooktwitterpinterestmail

Feeding Baby – DIY Stage Two Foods

Dear Sis,

Now that we are six months old and all  stage one foods have passed the 3 day tolerance test, we can start blending fruits and veggies during some meals:) Stage two also introduces new fruits and veggies to tolerance testing. We tested at breakfast by serving a new food alone or paired with a stage one food we know is safe. Lunch and dinner we get to pallet play with our whole spectrum of tested tastes.

Stage Two Veggies (6 mo +)

Stage two foods are typically a bit thicker than stage one foods, but they are still strained. Especially for babies who don’t have any teeth yet!

Beets

Baking Instructions: Wash and trim greens from fresh beets.  Bake in an oven safe dish, covered with foil at 350 for an 45 minute – an hour. Baking time varies based upon size of beet root.  Stand until cooled enough to handle. Then, peel, chop, and puree.

Steaming Instructions: Wash and trim away greens from fresh beets. Then, peel, chop, and steam 8-10 minutes before pureeing.

Corn (technically a grain)

Fresh Instructions: Boil shucked ears of corn 5-7 minutes, cool enough to handle, and cut corn from cob before pureeing.

Frozen Instructions: Thaw and puree.

Parsnips

Peel and chop. Steam parsnips 8-10 minutes and turnips 15 minutes before pureeing.

Pumpkin

We purchase canned puree and spoon it into freezer containers to portion. 

For puree from fresh pumpkin, purchase 1 1/4 pound pie pumpkin. Half and scoop out seeds.

Baking Instructions:  Place facedown on a foil lined baking sheet and bake at 375 for 1 1/2 hours. Cool enough to handle, scoop fresh of pumpkin from skin, and puree.

Steaming Instructions:  Quarter, steam pumpkin 20 minutes, puree.

Spinach

Fresh Instructions: Purchase organic greens with stems removed. Steam 3-5 minutes in small batches before pureeing.

Frozen Instructions: Thaw and puree.

Stage Two Fruits (6 mo +)

Apricots

Dried Apricots:  Rehydrate fruit by steeping 30 minutes in boiling water, as with tea. Remove fruit from water, use reserved water as needed when pureeing.

Fresh:  No cooking is needed. Simply wash and chop fresh apricots before pureeing.

Berries (Blueberries, Raspberries, Strawberries)

No cooking required. Wash and remove stems before pureeing.

Berries are acidic. In some babies, they cause diaper rash. As I precaution, I make sure berries are no more than 50% of a puree blend.  If your baby is adversely affected, wait until 1 year of age and then try again.

Cherries

Fresh: Stem and pit before pureeing uncooked fruit.

Frozen: Thaw and puree.

Compatible Flavors

Apple is compatible with Apricot, Avocado, Banana, Beet, Blueberry, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Cherry, Green Bean, Mango, Peach, Pear, Pumpkin, Raspberry, Spinach, Strawberry, Sweet Corn, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Apricot is compatible with Apple, Banana, Blueberry, Carrot, Cherry, Mango, Peach, Pear, Pumpkin, Raspberry, Strawberry, and Sweet Corn.

Avocado is compatible with Apple, Banana, Beet, Blueberry, Mango Peach, Pear, Raspberry, and Strawberry.

Banana is compatible with Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Blueberry, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Cherry, Green Bean, Mango, Parsnip, Peach, Pear, Pumpkin, Raspberry, Spinach, Strawberry, Sweet Corn, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Beet is compatible with Apple, Avocado, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Parsnip, Pear, Pumpkin, Sweet Corn, and Sweet Potato.

Blueberry is compatible with Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Banana, Carrot, Cherry, Mango, Peach, Pear, Raspberry, Spinach, and Strawberry.

Butternut Squash is compatible with Apple, Banana, Beet, Carrot, Cherry, Green Bean, Parsnip, Peach, Pear, Spinach, Sweet Corn, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Carrot is compatible with Apple, Apricot, Banana, Beet, Blueberry, Butternut Squash, Green Bean, Parsnip, Pear, Pumpkin, Raspberry, Spinach, Sweet Corn, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Cherry is compatible with Apple, Apricot, Banana, Blueberry, Butternut Squash, Mango, Peach, Pear, Pumpkin, and Sweet Corn.

Green Bean is compatible with Apple, Banana, Butternut Squash, Carrots, Sweet Peas, Parsnip, Peach, Pear, Pumpkin, Sweet Corn, and Sweet Potato.

Mango is compatible with Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Banana, Blueberry, Cherry, Peach, Pear, Raspberry, and Strawberry.

Parsnip is compatible with Apple, Banana, Beet, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Green Bean, Pear, Pumpkin, Spinach, Sweet Corn, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Peach is compatible with Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Banana, Blueberry, Cherry, Green Bean, Mango, Pear, Raspberry, Spinach, and Strawberry.

Pear is compatible with Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Banana, Beet, Blueberry, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Cherry, Green Bean, Mango, Parsnip, Peach, Pumpkin, Raspberry, Spinach, Strawberry, Sweet Corn, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Raspberry is compatible with Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Banana, Blueberry, Carrot, Mango, Peach, Pear, Spinach, and Strawberry.

Spinach is compatible with Apple, Banana, Blueberry, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Parsnip, Peach, Pear, Pumpkin, Raspberry, Strawberry, and Sweet Potato.

Sweet Corn is compatible with Apple, Apricot, Banana, Beet, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Cherry, Green Bean, Parsnip, Pear, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Sweet Pea is compatible with Apple, Banana, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Green Bean, Parsnip, Pear, Pumpkin, Sweet Corn, and Sweet Potato.

Sweet Potato is compatible with Apple, Banana, Beet, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Green Bean, Parsnip, Pear, Spinach, Sweet Corn, and Sweet Pea.

. . . . .

Each puree and puree combination has its own consistency. However I’ve discovered that a very specific consistency is idea for feeding. If the food is too liquid-y it tends to fall out of babies mouth or splatter during the eating process. We mix in cereal a sprinkle at a time, until we reach the desired consistency.

Now that baby is bigger it is perfectly normal to be eating up to 4T, three meals a day. Mr. Baby’s hunger is less substantial, at a norm of 3T, three meals a day.

Happy Baby Feeding!

b

Introducing Cereal

DIY Stage One Foods

Introducing Meats & Yogurt

Facebooktwitterpinterestmail

Feeding Baby – DIY Stage One Foods

Dear Sis,

It is hard to believe Mr. Baby is six months old! Introducing foods has been a pretty easy process… so far. We make many of them homemade, which is surprisingly easy, and often more flavorful, especially in the case of green veggies. I thought we would make a post so all the busy moms can see that they too can be to make fresh whole foods available to their babies.

At our 4 month well-baby check our pediatrician gave us the go-ahead to start introducing solids or the go-ahead to hold off until six months depending on our preference. Since Mr. Baby is tall and lean and rarely goes more than 2-2.5 hours between breast feedings, I decided to see if food could help him gain and maybe even extend the duration between feedings.

Cereal

We chose oatmeal because it is tummy gentle like rice, but with more nutritional value. Each evening I would pump a few minutes to get 1/2 an once of breastmilk, mix in a bit of baby oatmeal cereal, and try to get Mr. Baby to eat it. The first week, he wore all of it. The second week, his tongue started pushing some of the food back instead of forward:) By the third week he was swallowing well and awaiting the spoon with anticipation! By week four he was wishing more was in the bowl, after the feeding was complete. 

At five months, I began introducing veggies. As recommended by the pediatrician, we tried each new food three days in a row and watch for signs of allergy or intolerance. Now, after just six weeks, Mr. Baby eats a variety of fruits and veggies. 

Taste Test

To save yourself the trouble, get one of each stage one puree from the grocery store and let baby try it, to see if they take to that food, before you invest the time to make a batch of homemade puree:)

Shopping for Ingredients

We’ve learned that some purees can be made from raw produce, while others are easier to make from frozen or canned states. Additionally, we keep The Dirty Dozen and The Clean Fifteen in mind while we shop.

Preparing Stage One Veggies (4-6 months)

Butternut Squash 

We purchase fresh. We cut it in half, scoop out the seeds, place it face down on a baking sheet, and bake it for about an 40 minutes at 350. Stand until cooled enough to handle or chill until the following day. Scoop meaty bits of squash from skin before pureeing. In my opinion, baked squash has richer flavor and makes a thicker puree than its steamed counterpart.

When I don’t have baking time, I purchase fresh pre-cut or frozen butternut squash and steam it for 7-10 minutes until it is soft enough to puree.

Carrots

We purchase fresh. We peel, chop, and steam 8-10 minutes until it is soft enough to puree. Baby carrots can be used to skip the peeling and chopping steps. 

Green Beans

Fresh or frozen green beans are harder to puree than most food, because of their stringy fiber. They do best in the food processor. Blenders and stick blenders have a hard time unless the beans are overcooked and lose their vibrant green-ness. Steam frozen beans 5 minutes… fresh take a bit longer to soften enough for pureeing.

Sweet Peas

We purchase frozen and let them thaw on the counter a few hours or in the fridge overnight. Then puree without steaming. For fresh shelled peas, steam 2-3 minutes before pureeing.

Sweet Potatoes

We purchase fresh. Pierce each sweet potato skin a few times with a fork and bake them on a foil lined sheet for 45 minutes – 1 hour at 400. Stand until cool enough to handle, spoon in half longways, and scoop out the flesh with a spoon before pureeing. In my opinion, baked sweet potato has richer flavor and makes a thicker puree than its steamed counterpart.

When I don’t have baking time, I peel, chop, and steam the sweet potatoes 8-10 minutes before pureeing.

Preparing Stage One Fruits

Apples & Pears

We purchase organic and fresh. We peel, core, chop, and steam 10 minutes before pureeing.

In a pinch, I’ve also purchased organic unsweetened applesauce cups for traveling. I admit on busy Nanny weeks I have even purchase jared organic unsweetened applesauce and froze it in portions to save the time making it homemade.

Avocado

We purchase fresh. We place about 1/4 of the peeled pitted fruit into a dish and puree it with a fork just before feeding time.

Bananas

We purchase fresh. We place about 1/3 or the peeled fruit in a dish and puree it with a fork just before feeding time. Another great traveling food!

Mangos & Peaches

We purchase frozen mangos and organic peaches, because they weren’t in season, and let them thaw on the counter a few hours or in the fridge overnight. When in season, fresh mangos and organic peaches require no cooking: just peel, chop, and puree.

Pureeing & Straining

With the exception of banana, which we make fresh before each feeding, other fruit and veggies we prepare and freeze. 

Kitchen Tools

  1. A batter bowl or other high sided container to place cooked, thawed, or drained canned food into.
  2. A stick blender to quickly puree the food with easy clean up. A regular blender or food processor will work too, but they take longer to clean between uses. Some foods are thicker than others, if the blender is working to hard, thin with water as needed.
  3. A sieve, rubber scrapper, and bowl to strain the pureed food so that it is free of large pieces or fiber stands that can choke little babies.

Freezing

  1. Spoon tablespoonfuls of puree into freezer trays.  We prefer silicone brownie bite pans for portioning and freezing, but ice cube trays, or specialty baby food freezer containers work too.
  2. Once frozen, we transfer frozen puree cubed into labeled dated freezer bags

Feeding Time 

What time of day you serve baby’s meal is a matter of convenience. Just be consistent! For example, at 5 months we were having 2 T puree at lunch time and 2 T cereal with breastmilk at dinner time. Once you’ve tolerance tested each singular food, it is safe to begin pairing flavor combinations, which works great for babies that don’t like to switch from fruit to veggie flavors in one feeding. Follow your babies hunger cues to know when they are ready for larger portions or additional meal times. 

Pairing Tastes

Apple pairs well with Avocado, Banana, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Green Bean, Mango, Peach, Pear, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Avocado pairs well with Apple, Banana, Mango, Peach, and Pear

Banana pairs well with Apple, Avocado, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Green Bean, Mango, Peach, Pear, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Butternut Squash pairs well with Apple, Banana, Carrot, Green Bean, Peach, Pear, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Carrot pairs well with Apple, Banana, Butternut Squash, Green Bean, Pear, Sweet Pea, and Sweet Potato.

Green Bean pairs well with Apple, Banana, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Sweet Peas, Peach, Pears, Sweet Potato.

Mango pairs well with Apple, Avocado, Banana, Peach, and Pear.

Peach pairs well with Apple, Avocado, Banana, Green Bean, Mango, and Pear.

Pear pairs well with Apple, Avocado, Banana, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Mango, Peach, Sweet Pea, Sweet Potato.

Sweet Pea pairs well with Apple, Banana, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Green Bean, Pear, and Sweet Potato.

Sweet Potato pairs well with Apple, Banana, Butternut Squash, Carrot, Green Bean, Pear, and Sweet Pea.

Each puree and puree combination has its own consistency. However I’ve discovered that a very specific consistency is idea for feeding. If the food is too liquid-y it tends to fall out of babies mouth or splatter during the eating process. We mix in cereal a sprinkle at a time, until we reach the desired consistency.

Happy Baby Feeding!

b

Introducing Cereal

DIY Stage Two Foods

Introducing Yogurt & Meats

Facebooktwitterpinterestmail

Milk Matters

Dear Sis,

How I Imagined Breastfeeding

Before birth I knew I was going to be an exclusively breastfeeding mama! I wasn’t worried about the process. I believed baby and I would figure things out naturally and instinctually.

What Actually Happened… in the Hospital

I tried to breastfeed in the precious first hours, but baby couldn’t latch and I couldn’t figure out how to support baby and my breast in a hospital bed with a fortress of stiff pillows that slid willy-nilly every time I shifted slightly. After a patient hour or so of yawn riddled awkward attempts, the nurse suggested baby and mama get some sleep and try again later. After over a day of labor, I was exhausted and took the advice willingly. 

As we slept, a shift change occurred, and our patient night nurse was replaced. I was too cognitively and physically helpless that day to realize that the next nurse was more harm than good for our process. At feeding time, she would roughly position baby and myself. When my attempts to latch baby would fail, she would reposition my breast and stuff Mr. Baby’s face into it. He would inevitably cry, which would inevitable make me cry. All our crying made the nurse less patient than before and she would declare the feeding attempt complete after only ten minutes or just walk out of the room and leave my husband to deal with our sobbing mess. 

Although, the other nurses were much kinder during the remainder of our 48 hours of observation, there was no real consistency in the breastfeeding assistance they provided. As soon as we would start to get the hang of something, shift would change, and the next nurse had a better idea for us. 

I left that hospital thinking, “Something doesn’t feel right.” But I pushed aside that feeling as I remembered the in-house lactation consultant saying, “his weak suck” would improve with practice.

What Actually Happened… at Home 

The nursing pillow I ordered a week earlier was on the door step when we arrive home from the hospital. We put it to use instantly, which ended positioning issues! …and so, the cluster feeding began. Baby would suck the best he could, despite an insufficient latch. There was sleep mixed in for both of us, but I mostly remember the endless feeding. Over the next few days the colostrum began to flow, we visited the pediatrician, and we kept feeding. 

To make a long repetitive story short. Colostrum turned to milk. We visited the pediatrician a few times each week for weight checks. Mr. Baby wasn’t gaining as quickly as the pediatrician liked. After two weeks, she had us supplementing with formula and had me convinced my body wasn’t up to the task of making enough milk on its own. I was feeling like a breastfeeding failure.

During week three, our pediatrician was out of town and we met with the nurse practitioner instead. She was the first medical professional that really listened when I explained our nursing patterns. She suggested meeting with a lactation consultant to help baby with his latch, advised adding pumping to our feeding routine and taking Fenugreek supplement to stimulate milk supply, and suggested reading kellymom to learn more about breastfeeding and milk production.

Finding a Consultant

After a week of reading on kellymom, and being brought to tears more than once as Mr. Baby suffered from nipple confusion, gagged on his quick flowing bottle again, or just screamed when I put him to the breast, I asked the only breastfeeding mama I knew if she knew of any local lactation consultants that had helped her or any of her friends. Two days later, I had two names and phone numbers. That evening I called the number that came first on the text message. 

The lady I spoke with on the phone, had more bedside manner than any of the nurses in the hospital and she wasn’t even in the room! She listened as we described the struggles littering our breastfeeding journey, although we were a few hour drive out of her service area, and there was no promise of financial reward for her time and effort. She gave me confidence in my body’s ability to provide the milk my baby needed! Explained tongue tie, which she believed was the root of our feeding troubles, and promised to send us links to medical articles all about it, so we could learn more on the subject. She suggested bottle feeding an once before trying to breastfeed, taking away the panicked hunger feeling that made Mr. Baby scream, so he was calm enough to breastfeed, and suggested pairing our Fenugreek supplement with Blessed Thistle to further aid milk production. She told us to call anytime with questions, and wished us luck as we searched for another consultant closer to home. 

The next number on the list lead us to a consultant who could meet with us. We scheduled a visit for the following week and I counted down the days and read the articles on tongue tie while we waited!

Our Consult

She arrived on our doorstep with a smile, and instantly had Mr. Baby and I feeling at ease. She started the visit with baby laid across my lap, so her gloved hands could gently coax his mouth open so she could look around inside. She quickly located an upper lip and posterior tongue tie. She explained the corrective process and gave us contact information for two Pediatric Dentists who could preform the corrective procedure. She warned us about the cost and the likelihood that insurance wouldn’t cover it. 

Next, we moved on to feeding time. She weighted baby and we got him  positioned on the nursing pillow and he got to work. She weighted him again when he had finished. We discovered that all his work hand awarded him a single once of milk. She commended Mr. Baby’s effort saying everything about our latch was as good as it could be under the circumstances. His pour tied tongue just couldn’t produce enough suction to feed more effectively. He was mostly getting his milk intake by riding the coattails of my let-down reflex. 

Lastly, we went over pumping and supplementing. She assured us we had another month to get milk supply well established and feeding habits back on track. (When she visited, during week five, we were pumping six times a day and bottle-feeding pumped milk and formula after each breastfeeding session, so we were feeling pretty far off-track, by that point) 

The following day we made an appointment for Mr. Baby’s tongue release procedure for later in the week. Just two days before Christmas, he had the procedure and we spent the next two weeks transitioning to exclusive breastfeeding. 

Our Supplement Routine: 

  • oatmeal each morning for breakfast
  • 5 (610 mg) capsules Fenugreek three times per day
  • 3 (390 mg) capsules Blessed Thistle three times per day
  • 2 (650 mg) tablets Alfalfa three times per day
  • our usual prenatal vitamins

Additionally, we started playing around with different lactation cookie recipes. We discovered our favorites weren’t cookies at all, but lactation quick breads

Our Advice

Follow your gut feelings, no matter what doctors and nurses may say, and when they can’t help, find someone who can! We hope breastfeeding comes more easily for you, but if I doesn’t we hope that you will work through the struggles, and come out on the other side too:) 

Love,

b

Facebooktwitterpinterestmail

Snacks for the Breastfeeding Mama

Dear Sis,

It is hard to lose unwanted baby weight with high calorie snacks like chips, crackers, and cookies. (Late night ice-cream indulgence doesn’t help either!) Breastfeeding mamas need snacks mid-day and a sweet treat. Just two days of low calorie, high protein snacking and I’ve lost the stubborn two pounds that were part of my April weight loss goals.

Trail Mix
Yields 10
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 3 c dark chocolate M&Ms
  2. 2 c lightly salted peanuts
  3. 1 c whole almonds
  4. 1 c cashew halves
  5. 1 c dry cranberries
  6. 1 c pecan halves
  7. 1 c raisins
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a canister or food storage bag. Shake to mix.
Tag Sis, You're It! http://www.tagsisyoureit.com/
Additionally, I returned to making my own granola. That way I can control sweetening ingredients, what type of fat is used, and include more nuts for protein.

My recipe here: Vanilla Coconut Granola

Love,

b

Facebooktwitterpinterestmail